How to make MySQL inside Docker Production Ready?

It is easy to simply spin a new MySQL and assume that it is ready for the production. This can’t be further from the preparation of disaster.

Few days back I wrote about having a infrastructure docker file to do your development and I got a comment was it ready for production. Today that ‘No’ is about to change to ‘Yes’.

When application grows, the table grows and we need more in-memory, more innodb instances and more threads. However, default MySQL configuration is not changed for last 8-10 years. Machine has got faster, MySQL default config didn’t catch up to that. Thus it is important to override configurations.

This is one example:

docker-compose.yml

version: '3.2'
networks:
  dual-localhost:
    driver: bridge
services:
  mysql:
    image: mysql:5.8
    restart: always
    volumes:
        - type: bind
          source: ./mysql
          target: /var/lib/mysql
        - type: bind
          source: /var/log/mysql/
          target: /var/log/mysql/
        - type: bind
          source: ./mysql.cnf
          target: /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysql.cnf
    environment:
        - MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=some_weird_password
    networks:
      - dual-localhost
[mysqld_safe]
socket		= /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock
nice		= 0

[mysqld]
#
# * Basic Settings
#
user		= mysql
pid-file	= /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid
socket		= /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock
port		= 3306
basedir		= /usr
datadir		= /var/lib/mysql
tmpdir		= /tmp
lc-messages-dir	= /usr/share/mysql
skip-external-locking
#
# Instead of skip-networking the default is now to listen only on
# localhost which is more compatible and is not less secure.
#bind-address		= 0.0.0.0
#skip-networking #insecure
#bind-address = 127.0.0.1
#
# * Fine Tuning
#
key_buffer_size		= 16M
max_allowed_packet	= 512M
thread_stack		= 192K
thread_cache_size       = 64
innodb_read_io_threads = 2
innodb_write_io_threads = 2
# This replaces the startup script and checks MyISAM tables if needed
# the first time they are touched
myisam-recover-options  = BACKUP
#max_connections        = 100
#table_cache            = 64
#thread_concurrency     = 10
#
# * Query Cache Configuration
#
query_cache_limit	= 8M
tmp_table_size      = 32M
query_cache_size        = 32M
#
# * Logging and Replication
#
# Both location gets rotated by the cronjob.
# Be aware that this log type is a performance killer.
# As of 5.1 you can enable the log at runtime!
general_log_file        = /var/log/mysql/mysql.log
#general_log             = 1
#
# Error log - should be very few entries.
#
log_error = /var/log/mysql/error.log
#
# Here you can see queries with especially long duration
# slow-query-log=1
# slow-query-log-file=/var/log/mysql/mysql-slow.log

#log-queries-not-using-indexes
#
# The following can be used as easy to replay backup logs or for replication.
# note: if you are setting up a replication slave, see README.Debian about
#       other settings you may need to change.
server-id		= 10
log_bin			= /var/log/mysql/mysql-bin.log
expire_logs_days	= 10
binlog_row_image=minimal
max_binlog_size   = 256M
binlog_cache_size = 2M
binlog_rows_query_log_events = on

relay-log               = /var/log/mysql/mysql-relay-bin.log

innodb_log_file_size = 512M
#binlog_do_db		= include_database_name
#binlog_ignore_db	= include_database_name
#
# * InnoDB
#
# InnoDB is enabled by default with a 10MB datafile in /var/lib/mysql/.
# Read the manual for more InnoDB related options. There are many!
#
# * Security Features
#
# Read the manual, too, if you want chroot!
# chroot = /var/lib/mysql/
#
# For generating SSL certificates I recommend the OpenSSL GUI "tinyca".
#
# ssl-ca=/etc/mysql/cacert.pem
# ssl-cert=/etc/mysql/server-cert.pem
# ssl-key=/etc/mysql/server-key.pem
collation_server=utf8mb4_unicode_ci
character_set_server=utf8mb4

wait_timeout = 500
interactive_timeout = 28800

open_files_limit = 1024000
skip-name-resolve

join_buffer_size = 512K

innodb_buffer_pool_size = 3174M
innodb_buffer_pool_instances = 2
innodb_stats_persistent_sample_pages = 100
innodb_stats_transient_sample_pages = 24
innodb_rollback_on_timeout = on

How to make MySQL inside Docker Production Ready?

4 thoughts on “How to make MySQL inside Docker Production Ready?

  1. Configurations you have mentioned is not practical for my situation (and most) but I appreciate you have given an easy way to override it.

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